We Are Wellington | What is an OW? Meet one!

新版92最新福利At Wellington College International Hangzhou, we aspire to create a caring, international community that develops well-rounded individuals with strong values and the skills and identity to thrive within an ever-changing world. In fact, this is our vision statement. Community is at the centre of all we do at Wellington, and we continuously strive to work together with our parents, staff and pupils to develop that strong sense of community that makes international schools unique. In this series of ‘We Are Wellington’ articles, we aim to tell the stories of those families and highlight the special contributions they make to our community.

Last week, Wellington College Hangzhou welcomed Mr. Mark Milliken-Smith, a Governor of Wellington College in England, as a special visitor to the school’s campus.

新版92最新福利Mark, an ‘Old Wellingtonian’ (OW) himself, joined the Wellington College Board of Governors in December 2018. In addition to his main role as a Governor, Mark has been an active member of the OW Society by taking on matters of importance to alumni and preserving the heritage of the College as Chairman of the OW Cricket Club and Law Group.

For this special issue of ‘We Are Wellington,’ we were honoured to interview Mark to learn more about his perspective as an OW, a long-term member of the Wellington community, and as a parent whose two children have been educated at Wellington College in England within the last decade. In this article, Mark shares his thoughts about what makes Wellington unique, how the OW Society benefits the community, and how the College and its community empower children to become the leaders of tomorrow.

What makes Wellington special?

As an Old Wellingtonian (OW), Mark has been deeply involved with Wellington and its community over the past 43 years. Mark attended Wellington College and graduated LLB Hons at Bristol University in 1985. He was called to the Bar in 1986 and became a Recorder of the Crown Court in 2004 and Queen’s Counsel in 2006. He was appointed to the ECB’s Cricket Discipline Commission in 2016.

Mark is recognized by Chambers & Partners and Legal 500 as a “leading silk” in the areas of Crime, Financial Crime, Professional Discipline and Sport. He advises both corporate and individual clients nationally and internationally in each of these fields. His practice encompasses a wide range of regulatory and disciplinary issues including cases before sport governing bodies and regulators in healthcare and financial services.

Wellington has a special place in Mark’s heart, as it does for all those who have studied, taught, or visited; in part because of how it combines old traditions with bold new thinking. In 2006, Sir Anthony Seldon, the 13th Master of Wellington College in England, acted on his vision to transform Wellington into a coeducational school. This initiative ushered Wellington into a new stage of growth as male and female pupils came together for the first time in the school’s history and united through five core values: courage, respect, integrity, kindness, and responsibility. Just like Wellington College in England, these values continue to underpin the daily teaching and learning at Wellington College Hangzhou and they are deeply embedded in the behaviour and hearts of all our pupils.

How does the OW Society benefit the community?

新版92最新福利‘OW means you are part of the community.’ Some of Mark’s closest friends to this day graduated with him from Wellington College in England. As a proud member of the OW community, he enjoys playing sports like Old English cricket and rugby, taking advantage of these opportunities to catch up with the friends he first made several decades ago.

新版92最新福利Mark’s two children have also been educated at Wellington College in England: one from 2008 to 2013 and the other from 2010 to 2015. They are a living testament to Mark’s active engagement with the Wellington community and OW Society, having benefitted from an early exposure to the values that have shaped their identities and understanding of the world around them. He hopes that other children will have similar opportunities to immerse themselves in what Wellington has to offer and learn to appreciate the diversity of the community that makes it special.

At Wellington, we want every member of the Wellington community to be able to enjoy and benefit from their affiliation with the College.

Helping children become the leaders of tomorrow

Although Wellington College Hangzhou is new and in its early stages, it is nevertheless a fully developed school with world-class facilities and excellent staff who embody the Wellington Values for their pupils on a daily basis. As a result, it is easy to see that our pupils are developing a passion for learning that extends beyond the walls of their classrooms.

It is not easy to empower children to become the leaders of tomorrow. If, however, teachers can bring out the best in whichever child they are teaching – whatever that best may be – they will have developed confidence in that young person. With this confidence, the children will understand how to relate to anyone they meet. ‘To learn how to read other people; to be open themselves; and most importantly, to be able to communicate.’ Living in a global world, our children will be successful if they have the confidence necessary to hold firm in communicating the values and identities they have learned to transform their own communities.

Helping children become the leaders of tomorrow

新版92最新福利Although Wellington College Hangzhou is new and in its early stages, it is nevertheless a fully developed school with world-class facilities and excellent staff who embody the Wellington Values for their pupils on a daily basis. As a result, it is easy to see that our pupils are developing a passion for learning that extends beyond the walls of their classrooms.

It is not easy to empower children to become the leaders of tomorrow. If, however, teachers can bring out the best in whichever child they are teaching – whatever that best may be – they will have developed confidence in that young person. With this confidence, the children will understand how to relate to anyone they meet. ‘To learn how to read other people; to be open themselves; and most importantly, to be able to communicate.’ Living in a global world, our children will be successful if they have the confidence necessary to hold firm in communicating the values and identities they have learned to transform their own communities.